At Southwest Georgia Theological Seminary, we are concerned about the spiritual condition of every man. Leading men, women, and children to a more meaningful and deeper relationship with Jesus Christ is the foundation of all our goals. Isaiah 53: 5 states, "He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed". Walking on a road that leads to quality spirituality for ourselves first and then for others is at the heart of all we are trying to accomplish.   Spiritual health is as real and necessary as physical health and mental health. Spiritual health involves our soul, our emotions, and our thinking. We often view our healthy spirituality on our cultural and ethnic backgrounds and our faith practices. The journey to go deeper within is what I believe is the heart of true spirituality, confession, and communion with God. Care for our spiritual health is tied to everything we are as human beings. We are connected within ourselves; all we are is bound together, including our spiritual health and well-being. God often asked questions of his people. His first question to man was, Adam, where are you? Not that God didn't know exactly where he was and why he was hiding. God wanted Adam to look within himself, to go deeper. In the Bible, God posed questions to mankind to deepen their understanding of who He is, who they were, and where they were spiritually. As Christians, we look to our faith and God's love to help ourselves and others.

Life is often difficult and filled with pain and grief. Even ministers can find themselves in spiritual distress. As leaders, we shy away from reaching out to talk to others, afraid of being judged, betrayed, and embarrassed. However, we all need a listening ear occasionally and a compassionate heart to reach back to us in love.   With this thought in mind, we are establishing a ministry of presence at SGTS. It is called Southwest Georgia Theological Seminary Chaplaincy Center for Spiritual Care and is available with guest access. All information will be private and confidential. Make an appointment today with Dr.  Becky Flach. Reach out and take advantage of this new opportunity. Let's see what God will do.

Sincerely,

Dr. Karen Carr

At Southwest Georgia Theological Seminary, we are concerned about the spiritual condition of every man. Leading men, women, and children to a more meaningful and deeper relationship with Jesus Christ is the foundation of all our goals. Isaiah 53: 5 states, "He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed". Walking on a road that leads to quality spirituality for ourselves first and then for others is at the heart of all we are trying to accomplish.   Spiritual health is as real and necessary as physical health and mental health. Spiritual health involves our soul, our emotions, and our thinking. We often view our healthy spirituality on our cultural and ethnic backgrounds and our faith practices. The journey to go deeper within is what I believe is the heart of true spirituality, confession, and communion with God. Care for our spiritual health is tied to everything we are as human beings. We are connected within ourselves; all we are is bound together, including our spiritual health and well-being. God often asked questions of his people. His first question to man was, Adam, where are you? Not that God didn't know exactly where he was and why he was hiding. God wanted Adam to look within himself, to go deeper. In the Bible, God posed questions to mankind to deepen their understanding of who He is, who they were, and where they were spiritually. As Christians, we look to our faith and God's love to help ourselves and others.

Life is often difficult and filled with pain and grief. Even ministers can find themselves in spiritual distress. As leaders, we shy away from reaching out to talk to others, afraid of being judged, betrayed, and embarrassed. However, we all need a listening ear occasionally and a compassionate heart to reach back to us in love.   With this thought in mind, we are establishing a ministry of presence at SGTS. It is called Southwest Georgia Theological Seminary Chaplaincy Center for Spiritual Care and is available with guest access. All information will be private and confidential. Make an appointment today with Dr.  Becky Flach. Reach out and take advantage of this new opportunity. Let's see what God will do.

Sincerely,

Dr. Karen Carr

At Southwest Georgia Theological Seminary, we are concerned about the spiritual condition of every man. Leading men, women, and children to a more meaningful and deeper relationship with Jesus Christ is the foundation of all our goals. Isaiah 53: 5 states, "He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed". Walking on a road that leads to quality spirituality for ourselves first and then for others is at the heart of all we are trying to accomplish.   Spiritual health is as real and necessary as physical health and mental health. Spiritual health involves our soul, our emotions, and our thinking. We often view our healthy spirituality on our cultural and ethnic backgrounds and our faith practices. The journey to go deeper within is what I believe is the heart of true spirituality, confession, and communion with God. Care for our spiritual health is tied to everything we are as human beings. We are connected within ourselves; all we are is bound together, including our spiritual health and well-being. God often asked questions of his people. His first question to man was, Adam, where are you? Not that God didn't know exactly where he was and why he was hiding. God wanted Adam to look within himself, to go deeper. In the Bible, God posed questions to mankind to deepen their understanding of who He is, who they were, and where they were spiritually. As Christians, we look to our faith and God's love to help ourselves and others.

Life is often difficult and filled with pain and grief. Even ministers can find themselves in spiritual distress. As leaders, we shy away from reaching out to talk to others, afraid of being judged, betrayed, and embarrassed. However, we all need a listening ear occasionally and a compassionate heart to reach back to us in love.   With this thought in mind, we are establishing a ministry of presence at SGTS. It is called Southwest Georgia Theological Seminary Chaplaincy Center for Spiritual Care and is available with guest access. All information will be private and confidential. Make an appointment today with Dr.  Becky Flach. Reach out and take advantage of this new opportunity. Let's see what God will do.

Sincerely,

Dr. Karen Carr